Book Review: Go Dairy Free

January 27, 2009

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(“Um, Mum, you are taking us with you, aren’t you?  Because (and we hate to have to tell you this), we actually have more fans on this blog than you do.”)

[To everyone who voted for me in the Food Blog Awards, I can’t THANK YOU enough!  Although I didn’t win, it was really fun to be invited to the party (and to see my blog stats jump to their highest level ever one day as a result).  The winner, it turns out, was some little obscure blog that you’ve probably never heard of, “Mittens in the Kitchen,” or something.  I guess that’s the last we’ll be hearing from herBut speaking of winning, don’t forget to enter my contest to win chocolate or Sweet Freedom baked goods! You’ve got 3 more days.] 

* * * * * * * * * * * *

gdfcover123thin1 When I was asked a while back whether I’d like to review Go Dairy Free: The Guide and Cookbook for Milk Allergies, Lactose Intolerance, and Casein-Free Living by Alisa Marie Fleming, I didn’t hesitate to say “yes.”   I was already familiar with Alisa’s popular website,  GoDairyFree.org, and was tickled to have a few of my recipes included in her holiday desserts on her Milk-Free Blog.  Still, I had to ensure that the recipes were those I could enjoy (ie, no animal products, no wheat, no refined sugar). Alisa assured me that yes, the majority the book’s recipes fit my criteria.  That was all I needed to know! 

Go Dairy Free by Alisa Marie Fleming

Since being diagnosed with a milk allergy in her 30s (and if you read her story, you’ll be astonished at how long it took to reach that diagnosis), Alisa Marie Fleming has established herself as a pivotal force in the world of dairy-free and allergen-free living. 

As both creator and voice behind GoDairyFree.org, the website urging “A simple change for a better life,” Fleming provides online resources for those who shun dairy products, along with ample information for anyone with food allergies (many gluten-free recipes , as well as those for casein-free or animal-free diets also grace the site).  For her latest feat, Fleming has compiled a comprehensive guide and cookbook for those with milk allergies, lactose intolerance or allergies to casein (the protein in milk): Go Dairy Free.

Whether you’ve recently been diagnosed with a milk allergy or simply prefer not to eat dairy products, this book is chock full of useful, practical information.  The first 130 pages or so comprise the guidebook, offering information and explanations of the various types of dairy allergy, how they affect the body, and how to compensate after you cut milk products from your life. 

In addition to a plethora of shopping and kitchen tips, the book also provides an exhaustive array of dairy replacements (both homemade or available for purchase) for every product imaginable, from butter to milk to cheese to yogurt to creamy sauces.  (Who knew you could make your own potato milk?)  Fleming’s style is relaxed and converstational, yet the information provided is always clear, well-researched and easily accessible to readers.  This is the kind of reference book I like to keep at hand, to consult before shopping or while I cook; its place has already been secured at (easy-to-locate) eye level on my bookshelf.

The book’s cover entices with its vibrant, mouth-watering photos (by the immensely talented Hannah Kaminsky of My Sweet Vegan fame).  But it wasn’t until I read past the guidebook that I truly fell in love. There, following the encyclopedic discussion of dairy-free living, was yet another ten chapters–all of recipes! And virtually every recipe was one I wanted to try, with so many of them featuring the kind of ingredients and flavor combinations that I most enjoy. I couldn’t wait to get cooking.

Well, the recipes did not disappoint. They were easy to follow and delivered as promised. Here’s what I’ve tried so far: 

Light Apricot Scones

apricotsconeswhole

Given my penchant for all things breakfast or brunch, these scones were my first choice to try, and they certainly lived up to their name. With bits of tangy diced apricot throughout, the dense fruit offered a lovely contrast to the light, delicate biscuit.  These also paired well with my own Brandied Apricot Ginger Spread, as you can see here:

apricotspread6

Just look at the delicate crumb on this scone!  Both the HH and I thoroughly enjoyed these, and they were equally good the next day (they didn’t last beyond that, so I don’t know how they would have been on Day Three).

Pillowy Whole Grain Pancakes

alisapancakescut

I couldn’t resist trying out these pancakes, as Alisa kindly acknowledges my own recipe as her inspiration!  (I added some shredded coconut to these, just for fun).  The pancakes were, indeed, pillowy–airy, tender, and, as you can see from the photo, incredibly light (there are only three pancakes in that stack, folks–and just look at how high it is).

Breakfast Worthy Banana Bread

breakfastbanbread

This innovative bread was a huge hit in our home–which is why I don’t have any photos of individual slices (we gobbled them up too quickly to photograph).  You can’t tell from the picture, but this loaf is intensely flavored, incredibly moist, and wonderfully satisfying.  I ate this plain, slathered with almond butter, and topped with homemade pumpkin butter.  Both the HH and I pronounced this bread our favorite banana bread–ever.

Dairy-Free Feta-ish

polentafeta2

I’d been wanting to try the recipe for these polenta appetizers for over a year, but didn’t know what to use instead of feta. Then I saw Alisa’s recipe for this dairy-free version, and knew immediately I had to make it!  It worked beautifully in these bites, which I served to friends a couple of weeks ago (I’ll be sharing the appetizer recipe in a future post, even if I can’t reveal the feta secret!). 

Peanut Buttery African Stew

alisastew21

Redolent with creamy peanut butter and African-inspired spices, this stew became an immediate favorite in our house.  After a skeptical grimace when I first described the ingredients to him, the HH took one bite and declared, “Hey!  This is really good!”  (High praise, indeed, from my meat-obsessed honey).  As for me, I was equally enamored of the rich and subtly spiced sauce and big chunks of veggies.  Both the colorful appearance and deep flavor of this dish is certain to appeal.

Chinese Five-Spice Noodles

alisafivespice

Since Chinese Five Spice was already one of my favorite spice combinations, I knew I’d enjoy this dish even before cooking it.  The pairing of exotic spices with citrus here is sensational, in a dish that’s hearty enough for dinner but light enough that you’ll feel energized after eating it.  I’ll definitely be making this one again, too.

Peanut Butter “Truffles”

alisapbtruffle

While these dangerously decadent truffles aren’t my usual dessert fare (they contain sugar), I did mix up a batch in honor of the CFO  when she came to visit over the holidays last month.  With a smooth, velvety peanut butter filling enrobed in dark, rich chocolate, this candy strikes the perfect balance of salty and sweet, rivalling anything I’ve eaten from a confectionary.  They were spectacular! (I’d be sure to invite a crowd if you make these, as you’ll otherwise end up eating them all yourself).  

It was pure pleasure sampling these items from the book, every one of which I’d make again.  I’m looking forward to trying out many more of these reliable, interesting and tasty recipes.  Go Dairy Free is that rare combination in a food-related tome: great food and great advice, all under one inviting cover. 

Peanut Butter Cinnamon Popcorn (or Rice Crumbles)

TO VIEW THE RECIPE, PLEASE VISIT THIS PAGE ON THE NEW DIET, DESSERT AND DOGS, BY CLICKING HERE.

alisacaramelcorn

I simply couldn’t end this entry without a recipe!  While this one isn’t in the book (it’s from Alisa’s blog, One Frugal Foodie), it’s a fabulous recipe and will give you a good sense of Alisa’s style.  I tried this the other day and was thrilled to find such a delectable use for my broken bits of rice cakes (the ones I used were sesame flavor, and this still worked beautifully).  I think this mix would be sensational with added peanuts or cashews as well. Another PB-flavored treat that you won’t be able to resist!

alisacaramelcorn21

Peanut Butter Cinnamon Popcorn (or Rice Crumbles)

from One Frugal Foodie

TO VIEW THE RECIPE, PLEASE VISIT THIS PAGE ON THE NEW DIET, DESSERT AND DOGS, BY CLICKING HERE.

© 2009 Diet, Dessert and Dogs

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DIET, DESSERT AND DOGS has moved! 

If you’re reading this page, you’ve landed on the old site.  Please visit the new location by clicking here–and don’t forget to update your readers and blogrolls!

As always, thanks for reading.  I look forward to seeing you at the shiny new Diet, Dessert and Dogs!

“Um, Mum, we are coming with you, aren’t we? Because (and sorry to have to tell you this), we actually have more fans than you do on this blog.” 

 

* Or, Dream a Little Dream of Rich, Creamy, Delectable Frozen Desserts

[Dried Apricot Pistachio Ice Dream]

When I was contacted about a month ago to see if I’d be interested in examining a review copy of the upcoming The Ice Dream Cookbook by Chef Rachel Albert-Matesz, I have to admit I was a bit hesitant at first.  Despite my weak-kneed response to most sweets, I’ve never been terribly smitten with frozen desserts, though I do enjoy a scoop or two every summer (and used to LOVE those chocolate-dipped soft-serve cones we get here from the ice-cream truck that jingles along the streets in summertime). 

Then I found out that Rachel is a natural foods chef whose recipes are very much in line with my own and the NAG diet.  When I asked whether there were enough vegan recipes for me to try, she responded that virtually all the recipes in the book were already vegan or easily adaptable.  In addition, all were gluten free and naturally sweetened. Well, how could I resist?

The Ice Dream Cookbook is actually Albert-Matesz’s second book, on the heels of The Garden of Eating: A Produce-Dominated Diet and Cookbook (2004), which won both the USA Book News for “Best Cookbook 2004” and the Glyph Award for “Best Cookbook” 2005. She’s also written for the likes of Natural Home, Living Without, Yoga Journal, Oxygen Women’s Fitness, Muscle & Fitness, Veggie Life, Vegetarian Times, Vegetarian Journal, and  Macrobiotics Today, among others.  Both a cooking class instructor and a faculty member at the Southwest Institute of Healing Arts in Tempe, Arizona, she also hosts a healthy food segment on the show “Your LIfe A to Z” in Phoenix.  Clearly, this woman has had quite a bit of experience developing recipes, so I had very high expectations for the ice dream creations in her book.  I’m happy to report that they didn’t disappoint.

The book is more than just a collection of recipes, however.  Starting with the introduction in which Albert-Matesz outlines her path toward healthy cooking and how she came to write a frozen dessert cookbook, The Ice Dream Cookbook offers a wealth of information for anyone who’s interested in making frozen desserts–or any desserts, really.  Chapter One (“Essential Ingredients and Shopping Tips”) outlines the dangers of sugar and (for some) gluten as well as other questionable foods, along with an exhaustive glossary of preferred ingredients and shopping tips.  In Chapter Two, she describes the equipment you’ll need to make your own ice dream, from the many varieties of ice cream maker (electric or manual), right down to the bowls and knives that are best. The following chapter covers techniques for measuring and mixing to ensure your success when you whip up the frozen desserts.  From there, it’s on to the multitude of flavors–and recipes!

Starting with basic varieties such as vanilla, chocolate or cinnamon ice dream, the book then moves on to more exotic fare such as Avocado, Macaroon Madness, Lemon Cookie Crumble, Green Tea, Chunky Chestnut, Carob Banana, or Mango Orange flavors, among others.  I couldn’t resist trying one from almost every section (and it was a difficult choice, indeed).  The book wraps up with three additional chapters, with recipes for accompaniments to your ice dream: Sauces, A La Mode (pies, tarts, etc.) and Additional Indulgences (cookies for ice dream sandwiches and other confections). 

Overall, I was immensely impressed with the book and really enjoyed whipping up the frozen treats.  Because I use a Donvier hand-cranked (non-electric) ice cream maker, my only frustration was having to re-freeze the ice cream container between batches!  With all these recipes for amazing desserts, who wants to wait 24 hours before trying out another flavor?

Read on to see what I tried* (and for a sample recipe!): 

Dried Apricot Pistachio Ice Dream

This was the first recipe I attempted, and I was amazed at how soft and scoop-able the dessert was, even days after being placed in the freezer.  In this case, I used the lowest proportion of sweetener suggested in the recipe (a range is given), and while we certainly enjoyed the result, I think I’d opt for more sweetener next time (the recipes all include some stevia–I assume to reduce the amount of agave or honey–so I might just play with using all-agave instead of the stevia next time).  The combination of tangy apricot and chewy pistachio is brilliant here.

Avocado Ice Dream

Anyone who reads this blog regularly knows I love avocado (and even devoted an entire Lucky Comestible series to it!), so I found this recipe irresistible.  The avocado lends a creaminess and silkiness to the dessert, and with the combination of chocolate chunks (one of the variations provided), it’s truly addictive.  This one didn’t last long!

Cocoa Ice Dream (with candied ginger)

Not wanting to neglect the “basic” flavors, I chose (of course) chocolate.  This recipe is made with cocoa (there’s another made with dark chocolate) and was just delicious.  By this time, I was feeling pretty confident, so just threw in my own addition of chopped candied ginger, for a truly winning combination. 

Graham Crackers

Given my limited experience with gluten-free flours, I thought it would be fun to try out one of the baking recipes in the book.  These crackers were easy to prepare and baked up beautifully.  Mine came out a little too crispy to eat on their own, so I’m wondering if I overbaked them (the recipe does caution against letting them crisp too much in the oven).  The flavor was lovely, though–just like “regular” graham crackers.  And they’d be perfect for an ice dream sandwich, in which they’d absorb some of the moisture from the filling without becoming mushy.

Banana Daiquiri Ice Dream

This last recipe was hands down our favorite here at the DDD household–even The Girls got a teeny lick off my fingers (“Thanks, Mum!  Say, is there any more of that stuff around?”). The combination of creamy coconut milk, smooth and velvety bananas and tart lime was incomparable.  And with banana and a dash of rum in the mix, the dessert never freezes to the point of solid, so it’s soft and easy to scoop no matter how long it’s stored.  Which was a good thing, because we scooped aplenty.

Rachel was kind enough to provide the recipe for this lovely treat, so you can help yourselves to a sample dessert from the book as well. 

What a fabulous way to cap off the summer!

  The Ice Dream Cookbook is available through Rachel’s blog.

Banana Daiquiri Ice Dream

© Copyright 2008 Rachel Albert-Matesz , The Ice Dream Cookbook (www.TheHealthyCookingCoach.com)

Hands On: 30 minutes / Churning: 20 to 25 minutes / Yield: 4 to 5 1/2 cups; 8 servings

Here’s a grown up version of banana ice cream that I almost left out of the book. Don and I weren’t impressed with it, but we didn’t want to toss it.  So I gave it to a few friends. They raved about it. In fact, two little boys wouldn’t let their parents have any of it. Banana lovers, judge for yourself. If you don’t like liqueur, try the variation with rum flavoring or try the Roasted Banana Ice Dream.

Note: If using bottled lime juice, taste it before you use it. If left to sit too long in the refrigerator, lime juice (as well as lemon juice) can develop a strong bitter flavor.

Garnish with coarsely chopped macadamia nuts and fresh or frozen (but thawed) sweet cherries or the Cherry Sauce.    

Ingredients:

1/3 cup fresh lime juice (from 2 to 3 limes)

1/2 to 1 teaspoon lime zest (finely grated lime peel; colored part only)

2 teaspoons unflavored gelatin or agar agar powder (not the flakes)

3 tablespoons honey or agavé nectar; additional 2 tablespoons as needed

1/8 teaspoon finely ground, unrefined sea salt

1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon pure stevia extract powder or 1/2 to 1 teaspoon clear stevia extract liquid (start with less; add more only if needed)

2 cups unsweetened, preservative-free coconut milk (regular not lite), mixed well before measuring

2 cups packed ripe bananas, sliced (2 large, or 3 to 4 medium)

2 tablespoons coconut rum or dark rum or 1 teaspoon natural rum flavoring

1/4 cup coarsely chopped macadamia nuts for garnish, optional 

1. Grate the zest from the limes using a microplane or the small holes of a cheese grater. Set aside.

2. Juice the limes and add to a small saucepan. Slowly sprinkle with gelatin or agar agar powder. Let stand for 2 minutes until it softens and dry spots disappear. Warm over medium-low heat, without stirring, until gelatin or agar agar dissolves. Scrape the mixture into a blender, Vita-Mix, or food processor. Cover and process until smooth.

3. Add the honey or agavé, sea salt, and stevia. Blend. Add the coconut milk, banana, lime zest, and rum, or rum flavoring. Blend until smooth, stopping to scrape the sides with a spatula. For a sweeter taste add an additional 1/8 teaspoon stevia and/or 1 tablesppon honey. Blend, taste, and repeate if needed.

4. Pour into one or more wide mouth jars.  Cover and refrigerate for at least 6 hours before churning. 

5. Scrape the chilled custard into the canister of your ice cream maker.  Churn according to the manufacturer’s instructions. 

6. Serve immediately, or spoon into several 8- to 16- ounce freezer-safe containers. Cover and freeze for 3 or more hours for a firmer texture.

7. Soften solidly frozen dessert in the refrigerator for 45 minutes or on the counter for 20 to 30 minutes before serving [note: I found this step wasn’t necessary with this particular recipe]. 

1 serving (regular): 234 calories, 2.5 grams protein, 26 grams carbohydrate, 56 grams fat, milligrams sodium

1 serving (half lite): 299 calories, 2 grams protein, 24 grams carbohydrate, 10 grams fat, 47 milligrams sodium

Variations:

Lite Banana Daiquiri Ice Dream: Replace half of the coconut milk with lite (reduced fat) coconut milk. Alternatively, use 100% lite coconut milk, but plan to use the batch immediately or within 24 hours before it becomes hard and icy. 

Strawberry Daiquiri Ice Dream: Replace bananas with fresh or frozen (but thawed), unsweetened strawberries and their juices. Adjust the sweetness with 1 or 2 more more tablespoons honey or agavé nectar as needed.

 

 

* For those who might be wondering, yes, I tried all these sweets before I started my current ACD!

Pre-Blog Entry Blog Entry

August 14, 2008

DIET, DESSERT AND DOGS has moved! 

If you’re reading this page, you’ve landed on the old site.  Please visit the new location by clicking here–and don’t forget to update your readers and blogrolls!

As always, thanks for reading.  I look forward to seeing you at the shiny new Diet, Dessert and Dogs!

“Um, Mum, we are coming with you, aren’t we? Because (and sorry to have to tell you this), we actually have more fans than you do on this blog.” 

Just poking my head in now that I finally see an end to all this work.  I wish I could tell you I’ve been away so long because I’ve been galavanting in Europe, or galavanting in Australia, or even galavanting in the Muskokas–but nay. Sadly, I’ve just been entangled by a monstrous pile of assignments to mark. 

Have you seen the movie The Brother From Another Planet?  Well, right about now, think of me as that brother, at the instant he tumbles from the sky and lands on Earth. 

It’s sort of like that spacey feeling you get after shopping in a huge mall for hours at a time. You know the one:  you’re moving at breakneck speed–say, during the holidays–and you’ve been searching all afternoon but still can’t find anything for Aunt Miranda or cousin Sheila or baby Pookie. And then you finally realize you haven’t eaten in, like, four hours and your legs are weak and the air is somehow thinner than usual and it’s definitely time to sit down. 

Or how about that numb feeling you get when you’ve been sitting in the dentist’s chair for an hour and half while s/he goes spelunking in your molars repeatedly, asking you all kinds of questions which of course you can’t answer and your jaw is stiff as a rusty hinge and your saliva’s been sucked out of your mouth through a plastic tube and you no longer feel anything because the entire lower left quadrant of your face is frozen? 

Or perhaps it’s that stunned feeling you get when you’ve been arguing with the Customer Service Rep at the credit card office for more than 30 minutes in a vain attempt to find out why there’s an extra $472.06 charged on your card–which you never spent, certainly don’t recognize and don’t particularly wish to pay for–and now your throat is getting sore and your voice is getting hoarse and you simply can’t believe how dense this person is being and you’re beginning to despair that you may never see an end to this struggle (or ever see that $472.06, again, either)? 

Well, after almost three weeks (three weeks??  Where does the time go??) of absence from this blog and almost 300 assignments under my belt (it’s a pretty wide belt, in case you hadn’t noticed), that’s just about how I feel.  But since yesterday was exam day, our term is now almost over–and next week, I plan to return here, refreshed and eager to share. 

Well, The Girls are almost as excited as I am for my return to blogging–after all, this means they’ll reprise  their starring roles here at DDD, as well:

[“We’re so glad to be the center of attention again, Mum! When do we get to eat something?”]

In addition to all the marking, I’ve been devoting lots of thought to my dietary habits, inspired by Kathryn and her “31 Days to a Better Diet” series.  So there will, once again, be some changes in what I eat for a while.  I’m also excited to share news about a project I embarked on just about a year ago, even before I began this blog.  And I’ll have a book review as well–it will be a busy week!

I’ve sorely missed blog “chatting,” hearing from all of you, sharing recipes and leaving comments at all of the blogs I read.  Looking forward to getting back in the swing! 

Until then, have a great week, everyone. 🙂

DIET, DESSERT AND DOGS HAS MOVED!

If you’re reading this page, you’ve landed on the old site.  Please visit the new location by clicking here–and don’t forget to update your readers and blogrolls!

As always, thanks for reading.  I look forward to seeing you at the shiny new Diet, Dessert and Dogs!

“Um, Mum, we are coming with you, aren’t we? Because (and sorry to have to tell you this), we actually have more fans than you do on this blog.”]  

 

 

 vegan-express_thumbnail1.jpg As you may know, I was a startled and very delighted recipient of Nava Atlas’s latest cookbook, Vegan Express, as a result of Susan’s contest a while back on Fat-Free Vegan Kitchen.  A couple of weeks ago, I was thrilled to receive the book in the mail, and set about making a whack of recipes from it.  I thought I’d write a bona fide book review so you can all get your own taste of express cooking, vegan style!

Vegan Express by Nava Atlas

Vegan Express is the most recent addition to the long line of popular publications by veteran cookbook author Nava Atlas, already well known for her previous classics such as Vegetariana or The Vegetarian Family Cookbook and website, In A Vegetarian Kitchen.  A vegan herself, in this book Atlas addresses one of the foremost hurdles for vegan eaters, both established and newly inclined: prepping veggies can take up lots of time!   

 

 

Vegan Express provides an antidote for the kitchen weary by proving the truism untrue after all: turns out you can prepare fresh, healthy, vegetable-rich dishes in less time than it takes to watch the evening newscast!  Every recipe in the book, from appetizer to dessert, takes between 30 and 45 minutes from assembling the ingredients to digging your fork into that first steaming mouthful (and many take even less time).  

 

 

In order to write an objective assessment of the book, I decided it would only be fair to test as broad a range of recipes as I could manage in a week. As a result, I prepared seven of the book’s recipes, attempting to sample dishes from many different courses (though, given my natural inclination, I did lean rather heavily on the desserts). 

 

 

The book begins with Atlas’s own story of how she converted from vegetarianism to a vegan diet. She actually found the transition fairly easy, as nowadays, substitutions for eggs, cheese, and milk abound, even outside the larger  cities.

 

 

The book also discusses vegans’ nutritional needs and how to achieve them, debunking some common myths about acquiring sufficient protein or vitamin B12. And while Atlas does include some convenience foods (this is a book about cooking shortcuts, after all!), I had no problem using the recipes even though I don’t consume products such as soy cheeses or meat alternatives (as you’ll see when I discuss the pizza, below). 

 

 

The book also contains a variety of ease-of-use features to help home cooks prepare their meals in a flash. For instance, following each recipe is a “Menu Selections” sidebar that provides possible partners for the dish or other ways to serve it. Many recipes include variations for flexibility and to accommodate different tastes. There is also a fair number of “recipe-free” quick options, as well as further suggestions for some basic ingredients (such as “Speedy Ways to Prepare Tofu”). 

 

The book’s design is aesthetically pleasing, with clean, simple lines and two-color print (and how could we miss those luscious, color-suffused photos by Susan Voisin of Fat-Free Vegan Kitchen?).  Many of her readers may not be aware that Atlas herself is an artist with several solo and group exhibitions to her credit. Her cheery line drawings adorn the pages as backdrops that highlight individual dishes and ingredients.  

 

And the recipes?  They do, indeed, deliver as promised! All the dishes I attempted were quick to prepare, with straightforward, easy directions. Atlas also includes some nifty tips with certain recipes (such as cutting your pizza into slices before adding the toppings, as it’s so much easier that way). 

 

Finally, here’s what was cooking in the DDD kitchen last week:  

 

Soup and Entrees: 

 

Nearly Instant Thai Coconut Corn Soup

vecornsoup2.jpg

This is listed as one of Atlas’s favorite recipes, and a “must-try” for those who buy the book. As its title suggests, the soup cooks up in no time, and was truly delicious–light yet creamy, with a subtle spiciness interspersed with sweet, chewy corn kernels.  Fast, simple, easy…perfect.   

 

Singapore Noodles 

vesingapore1.jpg

I’ve was a huge fan of Singapore noodles in restaurants back in the day, but could never figure out how to make them. Who knew it could be so simple?  The HH and I both love spicy foods, so if I had any suggestions for this one, it would be to add more of the spice mixture (I used the maximum amount suggested and would have liked still more kick in this dish). The original recipe called for peas, but since we didn’t have any, I subbed edamame.  Still worked beautifully. 

 

Rich Peanut Sauce

noodlespeanutsauce1.jpg 

This sauce, suggested as an accompaniment to Golden Tofu Triangles, was ready in a snap.  Still in a noodle frame of mind, I poured it over some cooked kamut-soba noodles, tossed in an assortment of chopped and sliced veggies, and enjoyed a terrific cold noodle salad. Great the next day, too! 

 

Very Green Veggie Pesto Pizza

vegreenpizzalarge.jpg  This dish was by far the biggest hit of the savories–the HH ate half the pizza all by himself, and I must admit it was my own favorite as well.  My photo doesn’t do it justice, as the subtle variance in shades of green comes across here as rather monochromatic, but this combination of pesto underlying oven-roasted veggies is a perfect melding of flavors and textures.   

 

One change I made, however, was to omit the “cheese” originally called for (to be melted over the pesto, and under the veggies).  Since I avoid processed soy, I simply omitted that ingredient and vegreenpizzaslice.jpg sprinkled a little nutritional yeast over the top instead.  Both the HH and I agreed that the pizza didn’t even need the cheese, which, I think, would have actually detracted  from the disarming flavors of the pesto and veggies.  For the crust, I used my own trusty spelt pizza crust recipe, and baked it about 15 minutes at 425F before adding the remaining ingredients.    

Desserts:

While Atlas’s recipes are already healthy, I did make some minor adjustments to accommodate my own dietary restrictions. In general, I used spelt flour instead of wheat, and Sucanat for sugar.  It didn’t seem to matter—everything still came out terrific. 

 

Dense and Fruity Banana Bread

 vebancake2.jpg

This is a moist, not-too-sweet loaf with chopped dates and walnuts nestled in a banana-cocoa base.  As you can see from the photo, I was so anxious to try this one that I sliced it while still a bit too warm.  When I first tasted the bread, the cocoa was extremely understated. By the next day, however, the flavors had matured, yielding a lovely balance between the chocolate and fruit.  I thoroughly enjoyed this with some almond butter.  

 

Chocolate Chip Peanut Butter Cake

vepbcake1.jpg

This cake reminded me of treats my mother used to make when my sisters and I were kids.  Baked in a 9” square pan and cut into squares, this is the perfect after-school snack (lucky for me, I’m still in school!).  Peanut butter whispers its presence rather than bellows in this surprisingly light and tender cake.  As you can see, I cut this one while still warm, too, when the chips were still melty. Cut your slices small, because you’ll want more than one. 

 

Butterscotch Mousse Pie

butterpiefresh2.jpg

I had really, really wanted to try out the Caramel Pudding, but since I couldn’t find vegan caramel syrup and didn’t think my homemade caramel would work, I made this pie instead.  I’m so glad I did!  Although I’m not usually a “pie person,” this was truly delicious.  In fact, I’m going to post an entire entry about this one (including the recipe!!) in the next day or two—so stay tuned.  

I had enormous fun trying out the recipes from this useful and enjoyable book, and definitely look forward to sampling more. Thanks again, Nava and Susan, for this wonderful opportunity–and for adding another treasure to my cookbook collection.